AS I WALKED beside the Delaware River, I was surprised to discover how personally satisfying it was to finally make its acquaintance. The river is a natural feature that dominates the Mid-Atlantic region and has played an important part in our early American history including the Revolutionary War. Flowing south from the Catskill Mountains, the waters form the boundaries of five of the original 13 colonies (New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania) and acts like a "good fence that makes for good neighbors" -- a defining boundary that both separates and unites those on either side. 

George Washington on the Delaware - winter 1776

George Washington on the Delaware - winter 1776

The Delaware played a key role in the transportation and economic growth of the region, since access to the river was vital for agriculture, trade, and power development needed for survival. In fact, a series of canals were built to further the river's influence into the interior lands. Along with the Hudson, Patomac, and other regional rivers, these flowing waters served and nourished our forefathers as they struggled to build a life in the New World.

Of course, the most notable crossing of the Delaware involved that improvised boat crossing of General George Washington's army on December 25th, 1776, that led to a successful surprise attack on the British troops during the Revolutionary War. That single bold act inspired a young scrappy nation to continue fighting for our eventual independence.

Washington Crossing Historic Park

Washington Crossing Historic Park

Now, walking along the Delaware riverbank, I'm encouraged to complete my journey to its destination, New York City, and the Atlantic shore.

Week 35, Miles 2902,  Weather 71F☀️

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