During high tide, the Green Turtle seeks plant life among the tide pools, and isn't bothered by our presence while he's feeding.  What a voracious appetite he has!  For their large size the turtles are actually quite buoyant, floating from rock to rock washed by the wave action.  Check out this YouTube video...

http://youtu.be/WLVDQ97r8FI

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The adults live up to fifty years, and can stay submerged for long periods.  We watched as they fed underwater for 5 minutes at a time before taking a quick gulp of air and returning to their feeding activity.

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And sometimes, when we're lucky, we come across Mr. turtle just basking on the beach.  He's probably taking a break from the constant tidal wash and soaking in the warmth of that Hawaiian sunshine. Just like us! 

 

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AuthorRich Monroe

MOST VISITORS come to the islands to enjoy the beaches.  Balmy breezes and warm water acts like a magnet, eventually drawing everyone to the shores where they will test the waters.   Hawaii's beaches come in a wide variety -- black, white, or green sands -- or just jumbled lava rock. Take your pick!  Mother Nature adds to the variation with every volcanic eruption...

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AuthorRich Monroe

ST. BENEDICT'S PAINTED CHURCH is a charming little chapel established in the 1800s as a Catholic worship center on the island.  The colorful frescos were painted on the walls and ceiling a hundred years later by Father Velge to display stories including the life of Christ and the concept of Hell -- a dramatic way to communicate Christian concepts.

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And today, natural enemies, like termites, age and wood rot are beginning to take a toll, but it's still a marvelous place to visit.  I especially enjoyed wandering through the historic cemetery filled with marble headstones, flowers, and native plants -- all facing west toward those inspiring Hawaiian sunsets.

 

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AuthorRich Monroe

We were turned back by Park Rangers today, so we're watching the local news to see if we can return to visit this historic site.

One news article regarding the big ocean swells:   

Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park was slated to remain closed through the weekend and will only open in phases after that.

“What we’re seeing is as bad or worse than the tsunami of 2011,” said park superintendent Tammy Duchesne. “Many of the sea walls were breached and in many areas they just look like rubble.”

The Royal Grounds were swamped with surf, and rocks and debris scattered through the park. The road to the picnic area was washed out and must be repaired before that portion of the park can reopen, Duchesne said. The public can stay updated on closures through the park’s website or Facebook page, she said.

Many West Hawaii beach parks remained closed Friday and a high surf warning remained in effect until 6 p.m. today.

Waves 10 to 15 feet high were forecast for west-facing shores Friday and today, according to the National Weather Service, with a reinforcement of swell height Friday night and Saturday expected to keep waves within the hazard range. North shores of Oahu, Molokai and Maui were slated for waves today in the 20 to 30 foot range, up from 15 to 20 feet.

Closed for repairs! 

Closed for repairs! 

Posted
AuthorRich Monroe

IT APPEARS that some of the best surfing on the Big Island is right here in Kona.  And we have a wonderful view from our own condo lanai.  Before sunrise groups of die hard surfers gather to catch the early waves, and the activity continues throughout the day.  What a show!

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The wave forms are so consistent and predictable that even small boats join in the fun! However, the benefits from these super waves apparently has a downside:  that several Hawaii beaches and parks are closed due to damage sustained from the high surf. Mother Nature can be harsh sometimes.  Hopefully, the parks will reopen before we leave the island this week.

 

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AuthorRich Monroe